Thursday, March 26, 2009

At least one columnist doesn't care for those Thunderstix the Korean fans were using. I didn't realize they were controversial.

5 comments:

kushibo said...

One can easily misread this as thinking thundersticks are a Korean creation or something made popular by Korean fans, neither of which is apparently true.

As for the author of this San Francisco story, one of her quotes, contrasting Angels fans in the 2002 World Series with enthusiastic Korean fans...

We didn't see any of that Stepford-fan quality that often accompanied the Stix in Anaheim in '02.

... all I can say is "Bite me." She apparently is stuck in that NoCal-versus-SoCal animosity that plagues California's inter-regional relations, and she's taking it out on the Thundersticks.

And, geez, if she's going to call it "the Angels' stadium in Anaheim," instead of just "Angel Stadium," it's clear she's talking out her butt.

I, for one, happen to enjoy the Thundersticks. My most recent trip to a ball game in 2005 at Olympic Stadium, was enhanced because of the stix. And I say that not realizing that they played such an important role in the Orange County home team finally winning a World Series six years ago.

Nathan Schwartzman said...

People have been complaining about them ever since the 2002 World Series. Personally I think it's lame to be making noise with anything other than your throat. I'm not a fan of the drums that Korean fans bang on.

The Clam said...

Korean fans are suckers for group chants and toys. Going to baseball games here is fun, but I get the feeling that people cheer only to be part of a chant and not out of enthusiasm.

Dave said...

I agree with the Clam. But I don't see it as a bad thing at all. It gives the people at games who are not such baseball purists as I something interesting to do. I think the cheering, chanting, games between innings make a ball game in Korea more widely appealing. Nothing wrong with that. Although I've been bopped many times with the thunder stix and they DO get in the way of the view, I don't mind them.

Brian said...

I've never used Thunderstix, or even been to a Korean baseball game yet. Do they fall into the same category, then, as all the excessive dance songs and contests they do at American sporting events? Long gone are the days where you can just sit and watch the game. The scoreboard is always hollering at you to cheer, to look this way, look that way, to do something, all while listening to the top dance hits of 1992.